Mediterranean Sardines over Fennel and Arugula

Serves 4

Of course, sardines are one of the best sources of the omega-3 fatty acids we need.  They are also inexpensive, readily available, and sustainable; in fact, there is a great abundance of sardines in the world today, one of the few choice wild fish populations not in decline.  If you don’t like sardines, I’m not going to tell you that this recipe will change your mind, but I think the mustard-y vinaigrette and herbs nicely offset their fishiness.

Vinaigrette
Makes 1 cup

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon minced shallot
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
½ teaspoon sea salt
⅛ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil  
½ cup chopped tomatoes
2 teaspoons chopped capers (drained and rinsed)
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh oregano (or ¾ teaspoon dried whole oregano)


Salad
6 cups arugula
¼ cup fresh Italian parsley leaves
2 cups thinly sliced fennel bulbs
2 to 3 (5-ounce) cans of sardines , boneless, skinless, packed in water
1 avocado, quartered and sliced

  1. Put the lemon juice, Dijon mustard, shallots, salt and pepper in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Slowly pour in the olive oil, whisking all the while, and continue whisking until smooth, or blend the ingredients in a jar with the solid disk of an immersion blender.  Add the tomatoes, capers and oregano and stir to combine.
  2. Combine the arugula, parsley, and fennel with half of the vinaigrette and gently toss. Divide dressed greens evenly onto plates and top each portion with some sardines.
  3. Spoon 1 tablespoon of remaining dressing over the top of the sardines. Place a quarter of an avocado on each plate and serve.

Reprinted with permission from Andrew Weil, MD, Fast Food, Good Food: More Than 150 Quick and Easy Ways to Put Healthy, Delicious Food on the Table. Copyright © 2015 by Andrew Weil, Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group. New York, NY.