Super Salads

Lemon Mustard Salmon Salad

Lemon Mustard Salmon Salad

All salmon are not created equal. This recipe features wild Alaskan sockeye. Wild salmon are far higher in omega-3s than their farm-raised brethren, and omega-3s have been linked to a host of cancer-fighting benefits. You don’t even have to go fishing or handle a salmon fillet to make this dish; there are great brands of wild sockeye that come in cans (see Resources). That said, you can also make this with an equal amount of leftover home-cooked salmon. Either way, this salad is easy to prepare: all it takes is a quick stir with a few choice ingredients, and there you go—a nice, filling dish that’s rich in protein, yummy, and versatile. Serve it in a pita, wrap it in a tortilla, or pile it atop salad greens.

Asian Rice Salad with Edamame

Asian Rice Salad with Edamame

For ages, buying rice in America was like walking into an ice cream store and finding they had only two flavors. The vanilla of the rice world is bleached white rice, which has had its nutrients strip-mined away. Its chocolate counterpart is taste-less short-grain brown rice, which gave rise to the phrase “hippie gruel.” Fortunately, many different types of rice are now available. Basmati, jasmine, sushi rice . . .  Forbidden Rice (Purple Rice), is a terrific choice for rice salads because of its nutty taste and firm texture

Asian Cabbage Crunch with Sesame Miso Dressing

Asian Cabbage Crunch with Sesame Miso Dressing

Red cabbage reminds me of that saying “always a bridesmaid, never a bride.” It’s almost always used as a garnish, a barely glimpsed-then-gone adornment soon discarded in favor of the main course. Well, it’s about time for red cabbage to get its moment in the sun. It’s a longevity overachiever with anti-inflammatory and antibacterial nutrients. And women concerned about breast cancer, take note; indole-3-carbinol, a compound found in abundance in cabbage, supercharges the liver’s ability to break down excess estrogen. 

Mint and Egg Salad

Mint and Egg Salad

This is nothing like your grandmother’s egg salad. Instead of a heavy mayonnaise dressing, eggs are tossed with vibrant slivered mint leaves and a light dressing of olive oil and lemon. What makes this salad unforgettable is Paula grates the eggs, so they are ethereally light. (As her longtime editor Fran McCullough notes, grating also makes traditional egg salad velvety smooth.) Paula offered this recipe as an accompaniment to köfte, Turkish grilled meat skewers. But it’s so good, it’s been doubled here to be enjoyed as a stand-alone or with a green salad as a light meal.

Orange Pistachio Quinoa

Orange Pistachio Quinoa

Quinoa is its own little ecosystem, containing all of the essential amino acids that we must obtain through the diet. Put another way, quinoa brings some good nutrients to the table that the body needs to begin repairing itself. Its mild taste makes it a perfect backdrop for this nicely layered crunchy/chewy portable dish, in which olive oil, citrus, vitamin-rich pistachios, and raisins dance delightfully on the taste buds, and herbs (mint, cumin, and coriander) provide a huge hit of taste and anticancer nutrients.