Clean Out the Fridge Soup

Clean Out the Fridge Soup

I came up with this soup by polling my friends and neighbors to see what
they had sitting in their fridges. The whole point is that veggies no longer
in their prime are still perfect for a hearty vegetable soup. Here the culinary
color wheel came up with orange (carrots and sweet potato), tan (parsnip),
and green (kale, although you could use chard or spinach). Throw in a can of
tomatoes and a tablespoon of tomato paste from the pantry, along with some
quinoa and spices, and you have a scrumptious soup.

Marti's Fruit and Nut Chocolate Bark

Guest recipe by Culinary Nutritionist Marti Wolfson

This is such an easy, sweet recipe from my sweet colleague and friend Marti Wolfson. Perfect for a holiday or hostess gift, the ingredients can be varied as you wish! Dried cherries or blueberries can be substituted for cranberries, for example, and pistachios or other favorite nuts for the almonds. In a word: yum!

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients

½ cup slivered almonds
½ cup dried cranberries
zest of an orange
1 pound bittersweet chocolate, chopped
1 tsp. coconut oil
pinch fleur de sel

  1. To melt the chocolate, set up a medium saucepan with 2 cups water. Bring to a boil, and set up an additional heat-proof bowl over the pot. Add the chocolate and coconut oil and stir constantly until it is melted. Remove from heat.

  2. Line a sheet tray with parchment paper, and evenly spread out the nuts, cranberries, and orange zest. Pour the melted chocolate mixture over the nuts, and cranberries in an even layer. Sprinkle with salt over the top. Refrigerate until the chocolate is firmly set, at least 2 hours.

  3. Carefully flip the bark over and remove the parchment paper. Break into pieces and serve.

Reprinted with permission from www.martiwolfson.com

Gregg’s Stuffed Acorn Squash with Quinoa, Cranberries, and Swiss Chard

Gregg’s Stuffed Acorn Squash with Quinoa, Cranberries, and Swiss Chard

When a confirmed, dyed-in-the-wool meat eater starts claiming a vegetable dish is his favorite meal of all time, that’s when I know I’m onto something. I made this for my husband, Gregg, and he went absolutely ga-ga over it. (And no, Gregg’s not one of those guys who would say it’s great just because I made it. He’s an honest food critic.) I’ve noticed that a lot of people who avoid vegetables gravitate to this dish. It could be because it’s colorful or comes in its own bowl, but I really think it’s because the hearty taste elicits a comfort food response. Squash has so many things going for it. It’s easy to digest and has numerous qualities—anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, immunity-boosting—that make it a boon for anyone dealing with cancer. Squash is also a natural vessel for all sorts of wonderful fillings. And if you aren’t in the mood for roasting squash, this quinoa pilaf makes for a yummy dish all on its own.

My Friend Jo’s Special Sauerkraut

My Friend Jo’s Special Sauerkraut

I’ll admit it: I’m a ham. Take the last time I demonstrated how to make sauerkraut. The recipe is pretty basic: pulverize some cabbage, pour some salt over it in a crock, cover, and ferment. Not the most exciting of demos—unless you’ve got a friend, like my friend Jo, with a great sense of humor and knowledge of moi. I told her I needed a mallet for the demo; she lent me her mother’s mallet. It was about eighty years old and five feet tall, and was so big I had to get on top of a milk crate to wield it. It was chancy—the room was filled with three hundred health care professionals—but we all got a good laugh out of it. Hijinks aside, sauerkraut is easy to make—and it’s a great probiotic, leading to a sound gut, which, as scientists are learning, makes for a sound mind.